188 the aforesaid men [rebels] raised [a] cry, on the day of the feast of Corpus Christi, in the above-said year [13th June, 1381] at St. Laurence in Thanet, [today on the western outskirts of Ramsgate] that every liege man of our Lord the King ought to go to the house of William Medmenham, and demolish his house and level it with the ground, and ?ling out the books and rolls found there, and to burn them with ?ire, and, if the said William could be found, that they should kill him and cut off his head from his body (…) By virtues of which cry, the Jurors of the hundred of Ryngslo say, that these same [rebels] entered the house of the said William, and burnt the aforementioned rolls and books, and did no other harm to the said William.17 As with the Ciompi, bureaucracy qua its manifestation as a collection of inanimate objects was attacked. The prosecution alleged that the rebels had also received orders to kill the bureaucrat in question, William Medmenham. But William survived, either because the charge was spurious and the rebels never had lethal orders from the outset, or because they chose to disobey their instructions. Other Kentish court records show that ca. 10th-13th June there were at least eight similar attacks on the homes of other administrators and repositories of documents in the region.18 Of all these, there was only one fatality, the unfortunate John Tebbe, who was the member of parliament for Canterbury amongst other positions.19 This relative bloodlessness suggests that the orders to kill William Medmenham were phoney charges, and that John Tebbe was killed as a result of local resentments that pre-existed the revolutionary programme of 1381. My reasoning is that it would be strange if multiple groups had received orders to kill administrators and virtually all had disobeyed them. A simpler explanation is that none had orders to kill in the ?irst place. Tellingly, only one of the four accused of Tebbe's murder ("John London of Otehill (...) Henry Whyte (...) William Cymekyn (...) John Cook")20 was indicted for destruction of property, that being Henry Whyte. That is to say, three of the mob that apparently pulled Tebbe from his horse had nothing to do with destroying paperwork. The prosecuted Kentish rebels of 1381 may have enjoyed scaring bureaucrats, but they did not mean to kill them. There has been debate over how far the peasants wanted to eradicate all paperwork, or whether they only wished to target particular documents, especially contracts which stipulated feudal dues, or limited peasant liberties to do things like col17 Flaherty: 'Rebellion', 72. 18 Dobson (ed. and trans.): Peasants' Revolt, 146. These were “Thomas Oteryngton (…) Thomas Holte, William de Medmenham, John Tebbe, the castle of Canterbury, the town hall of Canterbury (…) Richard de Hoo, knight Thomas de Garwenton and Sir Thomas Fog, knight”. 19 Mate: 'Economy', 16. 20 Dobson (ed. and trans.): Peasant's Revolt, 146-147.
temp 1 temp 2 temp 3 temp 4 temp 5 temp 6 temp 7 temp 8 temp 9 temp 10 temp 11 temp 12 temp 13 temp 14 temp 15 temp 16 temp 17 temp 18 temp 19 temp 20 temp 21 temp 22 temp 23 temp 24 temp 25 temp 26 temp 27 temp 28 temp 29 temp 30 temp 31 temp 32 temp 33 temp 34 temp 35 temp 36 temp 37 temp 38 temp 39 temp 40 temp 41 temp 42 temp 43 temp 44 temp 45 temp 46 temp 47 temp 48 temp 49 temp 50 temp 51 temp 52 temp 53 temp 54 temp 55 temp 56 temp 57 temp 58 temp 59 temp 60 temp 61 temp 62 temp 63 temp 64 temp 65 temp 66 temp 67 temp 68 temp 69 temp 70 temp 71 temp 72 temp 73 temp 74 temp 75 temp 76 temp 77 temp 78 temp 79 temp 80 temp 81 temp 82 temp 83 temp 84 temp 85 temp 86 temp 87 temp 88 temp 89 temp 90 temp 91 temp 92 temp 93 temp 94 temp 95 temp 96 temp 97 temp 98 temp 99 temp 100 temp 101 temp 102 temp 103 temp 104 temp 105 temp 106 temp 107 temp 108 temp 109 temp 110 temp 111 temp 112 temp 113 temp 114 temp 115 temp 116 temp 117 temp 118 temp 119 temp 120 temp 121 temp 122 temp 123 temp 124 temp 125 temp 126 temp 127 temp 128 temp 129 temp 130 temp 131 temp 132 temp 133 temp 134 temp 135 temp 136 temp 137 temp 138 temp 139 temp 140 temp 141 temp 142 temp 143 temp 144 temp 145 temp 146 temp 147 temp 148 temp 149 temp 150 temp 151 temp 152 temp 153 temp 154 temp 155 temp 156 temp 157 temp 158 temp 159 temp 160 temp 161 temp 162 temp 163 temp 164 temp 165 temp 166 temp 167 temp 168 temp 169 temp 170 temp 171 temp 172 temp 173 temp 174 temp 175 temp 176 temp 177 temp 178 temp 179 temp 180 temp 181 temp 182 temp 183 temp 184 temp 185 temp 186 temp 187 temp 188 temp 189 temp 190 temp 191 temp 192 temp 193 temp 194 temp 195 temp 196 temp 197 temp 198 temp 199 temp 200 temp 201 temp 202 temp 203 temp 204 temp 205 temp 206 temp 207 temp 208 temp 209 temp 210 temp 211 temp 212 temp 213 temp 214 temp 215 temp 216 temp 217 temp 218 temp 219 temp 220 temp 221 temp 222 temp 223 temp 224 temp 225 temp 226 temp 227 temp 228 temp 229 temp 230 temp 231 temp 232 temp 233 temp 234 temp 235 temp 236 temp 237 temp 238 temp 239 temp 240 temp 241 temp 242 temp 243 temp 244 article02 article04 article03 article05 article06 article07 article08 debat01 article09 debat02 debat03 review01 review02 review03 intro01 article01