137 that it goes beyond the activities of characters, reformers and patrons we know by name, and on whom historiography had so far concentrated (including János Horváth) and tries to view the Reformation as the cause of a certain community. Although the print production of Hungary could not be compared to the German pamphlet literature, bibliographical research signi?icantly contributed to the broadening of the source base of the Reformation, and interestingly, this coincided with German research on towns and publishing. In 1971, the ?irst volume of the Régi magyarországi nyomtatványok [Early Printings of Hungary] was published, which described products published before 1600. During the editing of this work a number of bibliographical questions were solved, and legendary myths found their rightful places. Thanks to the thoroughness of the preparation of the book and the conscientious work of the editors, the ?irst volume of the series has hardly needed any amendments since. Despite all the shortcomings of the printing industry in Hungary, the primary way of passing down and retaining the sixteenth-century theological texts was clearly the press, not manuscripts. Questions like “how did they preach” or “how did they teach in the Hungarian Reformation” can be answered primarily based on the printed literature, in Hungary as in other countries, although the number of texts allows qualitative analytical methods more than quantitative ones. Can the source base of the Reformation research in Hungary be further extended? On the level of literature probably not signi?icantly, although interesting texts do appear from collections outside of Hungary from time-to-time, which have slipped the notice of nineteenth and twentieth-century source publishers. Further progress is possible primarily via methodological innovations and creative detours.3 In her research, Katalin Péter goes beyond the market town community, and analyses the Reformation of the peasant society, the gemeiner Mann, which is a ?ield extremely poor in sources.4 Her source containing the largest amount of and most authentic data for this research5 is the church visiting record (canonica visitatio) of Esztergom, partly available in print . This originates from the period 1559 to 1562 and was ordered by the Archbishop of Esztergom, Miklós Oláh.6 The research focusing on this material in itself leads to surprising results: in sixteenthcentury Hungary the principle of “whose realm, his religion” did not exist. Simple people (as individuals or as a community) could choose between the old and the new faith: they could question, doubt and decide. The patrons only interfered in exceptional cases, and they only in?luenced the process of choosing a priest with 3 Szakály: Mezőváros és reformáció, 16-27. 4 Péter: ’Die Reformation in Ungarn’. 5 Péter: ’The Way from the Church of the Priest’; Erdélyi: ’Lay Agency’. Source publication: Bucko: Reformné hnutie, 121-255. 6 Miklós Oláh (Sibiu, 1493 – Bratislava, 1568): BBKL 6, 1171-4.
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